Teaching with ATL in Mind

Date: 11st – 12nd October 2019

Workshop Leader

Lance G. King, B. Tech, Dip. Gifted Ed.(dist), M. Ed.(hons) – has 33 years teaching experience in both the secondary and tertiary sectors, is an internationally respected
author, teacher and workshop facilitator and is the creator of the Art of Learning programme presently delivered in thirty-two countries. Within the International Baccalaureate Organization he has worked on the development of the IBCC the MYP (Next Chapter) and the DP programmes and was the principal architect of the reformulated Approaches To Learning (ATL) curriculum.

He is married with four children, lives in Raglan, New Zealand and divides his time between teaching and presenting workshops for teachers, parents and students around the world and writing.

Workshop Description

This workshop outlines the ATL framework and gives practical suggestions on how to incorporate a focus on developing these skills into regular classroom practice. Ideas discussed will include the structure of the skills framework, vertical and horizontal articulation, cognitive, metacognitive and affective skills, teaching and assessing ATL skills, designing inquiry based learning around ATL skills and developing self-regulated
learners through helping students to take responsibility for their own skills assessment and development.
The workshop will be delivered in a “hands-on” style full of activities for participants and are all designed to give schools clear practical strategies.

Audience: all teachers and coordinators all grade level.

Language: English.


AGENDA

DAY 1

Session One 8:30 – 10:3O
Introduction
– 21st Century skills – purpose and need
– What are the links between the IB ATL framework and 21st Century skills?
– Skills based programmes in place around the world
– Thinking and learning skills selection to match student needs
– What is the overall aim, rationale and structure of an ATL programme?
– Identifying the Cognitive, Affective and Metacognitive ATL skills

Break

Session Two 11:00 – 1:00
ATL skills for High Stakes Exams
– Generic and Qualification specific Exam skills
– Teaching time and task management, goal setting and motivation skills
– What proportion of final assessment questions focus on demonstration of knowledge, skill acquisition, understanding and transfer?
– What skills and teaching strategies give students advantages in specific qualification examinations?

Lunch

Session Three 2:00 – 4:00
ATL Skills – Programme Design and Implementation
– What are the structural features of an ATL skills programme?
– Differentiating between Core Generic and Subject Specific Cognitive ATL skills
– Selecting the Cognitive ATL skills appropriate for your students and your school
– What are the steps of development of the Cognitive ATL skills across a student’s school life?
– How can you map out Cognitive ATL skills both horizontally and vertically?
– What are strategies for teaching the key Cognitive ATL skills?

DAY 2

Session Four 8:30 – 10:3O
Metacognitive ATL skills and Reflective Assessment
– What is the difference between meta-cognitive knowledge and meta-cognitive performance?
– How can teachers raise meta-cognitive awareness in students?
– What are valid forms of ATL assessment?
– How can students improve their own performance through meta-cognitive reflection on subject matter, ATL skills and teaching/learning strategies?
– Developing self-assessment practices

Break

Session Five 11:00 – 1:00
Affective ATL Skills – Teaching Resilience, Courage and Failing Well
– What is the significance of failure and a student’s reaction to it?
– How can students (and teachers) learn how to “fail well”?
– What is the role of attribution and causality in success, failure and self-motivation?
– How can students learn to be more resilient and more self-motivated?
– How can a school develop a resilience focused culture?
– Thematic and experiential strategies for teaching Affective ATL skills?

Lunch

Session Six 2:00 – 4:00
Metacognitive ATL skills and Reflective Assessment
– What is the difference between meta-cognitive knowledge and meta-cognitive performance?
– How can teachers raise meta-cognitive awareness in students?
– Is it possible to assess ATL skills in isolation?
– How can students improve their own performance through meta-cognitive reflection on subject matter, ATL skills and teaching/learning strategies?
– Developing self-assessment practices